Advanced Windows PowerShell Scripting Video Training

Advanced Windows PowerShell Scripting Video Training
Advanced Windows PowerShell Scripting Video Training

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

The Importance of TAB Completion

I start both my PowerShell and Windows Server classes off with a basic lesson on PowerShell’s syntax. This lesson includes the importance of using TAB completion.  It never fails.  I always find someone who insist on typing everything.  Here are a few benefits of press the TAB key.

  1. Faster typing
  2. Less work
  3. Greater productivity
  4. Fewer typing errors
  5. No more using parameters that do not exists.
  6. No more using cmdlets that do not exists
  7. Less troubleshooting

All these sound like good reasons to press the TAB key, yet there are those that will not.  For those who want to type everything, this is what you are doing that the rest of the PowerShell community is not.

  1. Working hard
  2. More debugging
  3. Wasting time
  4. Making typos
  5. More frustration
  6. More stress
  7. Less productivity

Remember, every time you press the dash “-“ key, type one or two more characters and then press TAB. It will make your life easier. It is strange at first, but once that lught bulb turns on, you will not believe how much harder you were working before TA completion.

Monday, October 26, 2015

Realizing Your Return on Investment with PowerShell

I’ll be speaking at the AZ PowerShell Users Group on November 3rd. We will be talking about your return on your PowerShell investment. We will look at what kind of information that you need to gather to prove your worth to the boss. We are going to justify your next raise or even help you keep your job. Yes, I will be handing out the code to do it.

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/arizona-powershell-users-group-november-meeting-tickets-19207088920

Removing a Local Users from the Local Administrators Group

Happy Monday all!

I’m finally getting around to posting some code from my last PowerShell class in Phoenix.  As always, I invited my class to bring an idea with them that they would like to try on Friday.  The idea that one of my PowerShell Rock Stars brought in reminded me of a problem that I had many years ago. 

You see, when the company that I worked for acquired another business, my job was to go in and join their IT systems into our domain.  Not a big deal with only about 30 clients.  This company had no dedicated IT support prior to our take over so I was going to be the first IT staffer the former employees meet when we hired them back.  All went well the first morning.  It was after lunch that I spotted a problem.

Before they all returned, I removed all the video games from the clients. Right after lunch, I was walking through the cubes and was watching people play video games.  Kind of bold considering it was their first day at work after being re-hired.  That evening, I discovered how they got those games back on.  They all had local administrator accounts.  Obviously, I missed something.

The question that I helped to answer in class was “How do I remove all local users from the local Administrators groups on my clients?”  I knew we could do it using the same method that we used to connect to Active Directory in PowerShell V1, ADSI. (Active Directory Services Integration).  ADSI can connect to a number of directory services besides Microsoft’s Active Directory.  In this case, a local security database. 

This is not my usual cmdlet type code that I like to dish out.  You can see a $ComputerName variable.  Just feed it the name of the client that you need remove accounts from the local Administrators group.  I’ll leave the error handling up to you.  I tested this code out on Windows 10 Client.  PowerShell remoting is required.

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$ComputerName = "CL1"

 

Invoke-Command -ComputerName $ComputerName -ScriptBlock {

   

    # Object to be created for each user removed from the

    # local Administrators group.

    Function New-OutputObject

    {

        $Obj = New-Object -TypeName psobject -Property @{

            UserNameRemoved = $Null

        }

        Write-Output $Obj

    }

   

    # Connect to the local security database.

    $adsi = [ADSI]"WinNT://$env:COMPUTERNAME"

   

    # Grab all local user objects and place them in a custom object

    $users = $adsi.Children | where {$_.SchemaClassName -eq 'user'} | Foreach-Object {

        New-Object -TypeName PSCustomObject -Property @{

            UserName = $_.Name -join ''

            Groups = ($_.Groups() | Foreach-Object {$_.GetType().

                InvokeMember("Name", 'GetProperty', $null, $_,$null)}) -join ','

            SID = New-Object System.Security.Principal.SecurityIdentifier($_.ObjectSid[0],0)

        }

    }

 

    # Get the local Adminsitrators group object.

    $Group = $ADSI.Children.Find('Administrators','group')

   

    # Get the clients name.

    $client = $env:COMPUTERNAME

 

    ForEach ($User in $Users)

    {

 

 

        if (($User.Groups).split(",") -contains "users" -and

           ($User.Groups).split(",") -contains "Administrators")

        {

          

           # Get a new copy of the output object and populate it.

           $Obj = New-OutputObject

           $Obj.UserNameRemoved = $User.UserName

          

           # Invoke the local groups REMOVE method

           $Group.Remove(("WinNT://$Client/$($User.UserName)"))

          

           # Send the object to the pipeline.

           Write-Output $Obj

        }

        Else

        {

                    }

 

    }

} # END: Invoke-Command

 

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

ISE Template for a Custom Property

Today in my PowerShell class, we are utilizing custom properties to allow us to create user accounts in mass.  In our scenario, we have a CSV that contains everything that we need except a property called “Name”.  We are using Select-Object to grab information from another property in the CSV to create our “Name” property.

To do this we have to type some cryptic code.  To make life easier, I’m sending my class the procedure below.  It will inject a new ISE Snippet that will create an easy to use template to create a custom property with Select-Object.

1. Create a new PowerShell script with the below line.  Do not be concerned if there are any errors.

@{N="##PropertyName##";E={$_.##PropertyValue##}}

2. Save this script.

3. Create a new script in the ISE with the code below.

$Text = (Get-Content -Raw -Path "E:\PowerShell\SOHash.ps1")

 

$Props = @{

    "Title" = "Select-Object Custom Property";

    "Description" = "Template to use with Select-Object to add a custom Property";

    "Author" = "Jason A. Yoder"

    "Text" = $Text

 

}

 

New-IseSnippet @Props 

4. Replace my path in line 1 with the path to the saved script from step 2.

5. Press Ctrl-J in the ISE when you need to create a custom property while using Select-Object.

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