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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Associate Managers to Their Subordinates

Today on PowerShell.org, I found an IT Pro who needed to find a way to associate a manger not only with their immediate subordinates, but also the subordinates of their subordinates.  Here is what I came up with. 

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Function Get-SubordinateData

{

Param (

    [Microsoft.ActiveDirectory.Management.ADUser[]]

    $UserList

 

)

 

 

    Function New-ManagerData

    {

        $Obj = New-Object -TypeName PSObject -Property @{

            "UserName" = $Null

            "DistinguishedName" = $Null

            "DirectReports" = @()

            "DRNames" = @()

            "Manager" = $Null

        }

        $obj.PSObject.TypeNames.Insert(0,'ManagerSubordinateData')

        Write-Output $Obj

   

    }

   

    Function New-DRName

    {

    Param ($Name)

        $Obj = New-Object -TypeName PSObject -Property @{

            "Name" = $Name

        }

        Write-Output $Obj

    }

 

 

 

    # Create a dynamic array to hold all of the objects to

    # be sent to the pipeline.

    $UserArray = @()

 

    # Do the initial population of the ManagerSubordinateData

    # Objects

    ForEach ($U in $UserList)

    {

        $Obj = New-ManagerData

        $Obj.UserName = $U.Name

        $Obj.DistinguishedName = $U.DistinguishedName

        $Obj.Manager = $U.Manager

   

        $UserArray += $Obj

   

    }

   

    # Cycle through all of the user objects passed to this function

    # and add subordinate data to the managers.

    For ($X = 0; $X -lt $UserList.count; $X++)

    {

        # If a User Object has a manager, process it.

        If ($UserList[$X].Manager)

        {

   

            # Get the Distinguished Name of the user's manager.

            $UserManager = $UserArray |

                Where-Object DistinguishedName -eq $UserList[$X].Manager

   

            # Assign that manager the Distinguished name and the Name of

            # the subordinate in the ManagerSubordinateData object.

            $UserArray | Where DistinguishedName -eq $UserManager.DistinguishedName |

                ForEach-Object {

                    $_.DirectReports += New-DRName -Name "$($UserList[$X].DistinguishedName)"

                    $_.DRNames += New-DRName -Name "$($UserList[$X].Name)"

                }

        }

    }

       

    # Write the data to the pipeline.

    Write-output $UserArray

 

<#

.SYNOPSIS

Returns all the subordinates of a manager.

 

.DESCRIPTION

Uses Active Directory to associate managers to their subordinates.

 

.PARAMETER UserList

A list of Active Directory User Objects to process for manager/subordinate

relationships.  You must include the extended property of "Manager".

The Get-ADUser cmdlet will not include this propertyt by default.  See

the Example section.

 

.EXAMPLE

Get-SubordinateData -UserList (Get-ADUser -filter * -Properties Manager)

Returns object that associate a mangers Dinstinguish Name with there

Distinguished Names pf their subordinates.

 

NOTES

Requires access to the Active Directory Module.

 

 

#>

}   

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Keeping a HASH Table in Order

When working with HASH tables, sometimes they display a little bit of a randomization problem.  Take a look:

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$Hash = ConvertFrom-StringData @'

Apple=Red

Orange=Orange

Banana=Yellow

Pear=Green

Blueberry=Blue

Plum=Purple

'@

$Hash

 

Name                           Value                                                                               

----                           -----                                                                               

Pear                           Green                                                                               

Plum                           Purple                                                                              

Apple                          Red                                                                                 

Blueberry                      Blue                                                                                

Banana                         Yellow                                                                              

Orange                         Orange        

 

The output is not in the same order that I provided when I created the hash table.  This is where PowerShell’s Ordered Dictionary helps.  Take a look at the change in the code and the output.

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$Hash = [Ordered]@{"Apple"="Red";

"Orange"="Orange";

"Banana"="Yellow";

"Pear"="Green";

"Blueberry"="Blue";

"Plum"="Purple"}

$Hash

 

Name                           Value                                                                               

----                           -----                                                                               

Apple                          Red                                                                                 

Orange                         Orange                                                                              

Banana                         Yellow                                                                              

Pear                           Green                                                                               

Blueberry                      Blue                                                                                

Plum                           Purple                

 

Just a few things to note.  You must placed the [Ordered] attribute in front of the @ or it will not work. You also need at least PowerShell V3.  Is there any advantage to using an ordered list? I would say this is just if you plan to display the hash table.  Otherwise, it works just the same as a none ordered hash table.